MGE to Grow Wind Energy

Saratoga wind farm would be MGE's largest wind farm to date.

MGE is seeking to expand the amount of electricity it generates from renewable resources. In April, MGE filed with state regulators an application to construct, own and operate a 66-megawatt wind farm about 200 miles west of Madison near Saratoga, Iowa. If approved, the Saratoga wind farm would be MGE's largest to date, with enough energy to serve about 47,000 homes.

Wind technology has advanced since MGE built its first wind farm in 1999. The Saratoga project is a cost-effective, clean energy option for powering Madison-area homes and businesses for years to come.

It's all about location

MGE began scouting locations for a new wind farm more than a year ago. Considerable research goes into selecting a site for wind generation. MGE engineers selected the Saratoga site for a number of reasons, including its strong wind speeds and proximity to transmission infrastructure to deliver the power. The site's more than 8,300 acres are primarily farmland. Most of the land will stay in production with crops surrounding the turbines. If approved by regulators, construction could begin in spring 2018 and be complete by the end of 2018.

We're committed to cleaner energy sources

Under MGE's long-term framework, Energy 2030, the company has committed to reducing carbon dioxide emissions and increasing its use of renewable resources. MGE has a goal of 30% renewables by 2030. Our interim goal is 25% by 2025. We know renewable energy is important to many of our customers and surrounding communities.

Energy 2030 continues MGE's long-term direction toward cleaner energy sources. In 1999, we built what was at the time the largest wind farm east of the Mississippi River, our Rosiere wind farm in Kewaunee County, Wis. In 2008, our Top of Iowa 3 wind farm in Kensett, Iowa, became operational.

The Saratoga project will host turbines taller than those at either of MGE's earlier wind farms. If approved, Saratoga's turbines would stretch nearly 500 feet high. Taller turbines with larger blades take advantage of faster wind speeds aloft, resulting in more energy produced per turbine.

To see additional features about how MGE is transitioning to greater use of renewable resources, visit energy2030together.com often and click Cleaner Energy.

Saratoga Wind Farm Height Comparison

published: 04-27-2017